Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Tea Party

Afternoon tea also known as low tea, is a light meal typically eaten between 3pm and 5pm. The custom of drinking tea originated in England when Catherine of Bragança married Charles II in 1661 and brought the practice of drinking tea in the afternoon with her from Portugal.

Various places that belonged to the former British Empire also have such a meal. However, changes in social customs and working hours mean that most Britons will rarely take afternoon tea, if at all.
Traditionally, loose tea is brewed in a teapot and served in teacups with milk and sugar. This is accompanied by sandwiches (customarily cucumber, egg and cress, fish paste, ham, and smoked salmon), scones (with clotted cream and jam, see cream tea) and usually cakes and pastries.
Here you are some British and American recipes to be eaten with your tea.


Cookies Recipe
For about 20 cookies:
·         75 gramms brown sugar
·         75 gramms white sugar
·         75 gramms butter
·         1 egg
·         1 tablespoon of vanilla extract
·         170 gramms flour
·         1 teaspoon of baking soda
·         75 gramms chocolate chips
·         Mix the brown and white sugar with the butter in a bowl until creamy. Use a fork or a wooden spoon.
·         Beat the egg and add it to the mixture.
·         Then, add the flour, vanilla and baking soda and mix all ingredients.
·         Finally, add the chocolate chips and mix again.
·         Preheat the oven at 180ºC.
·         Make little balls with the mixture and create the cookies.
·         Place them on an oven tray with oven film paper. There must be 5 cm between them.
·         Bake for 8-10 minutes.



2/3 cup flour
1/4 cup cocoa powder
5 tablespoons butter (melted)
1 cup brown sugar
2 eggs
·         Preheat oven to 375F and lightly butter a square baking dish (8x8).  
·         Place cocoa powder, sugar and melted butter in a large bowl.
·         In a separate bowl beat the eggs.
·         Add beaten eggs to cocoa/sugar mixture and mix well.
·         Add flour until just combined.
·         Do not over mix.
·         Transfer batter to baking dish.
·         Place in preheated oven and bake for approximately 25 minutes.
·         Do not overcook.
·         Let cool for 10 minutes, slice and serve.


·         8 ounces self-raising flour
·         salt, to taste
·         1 teaspoon baking powder
·         2 tablespoons caster sugar (superfine granulated)
·         2 ounces butter
·         1 egg, beaten and mixed with
·         1/4 pint milk
·         fresh double cream, to serve (heavy cream)
·         jam, of your choice
·         butter, to spread


·  Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder into a bowl and add the sugar and butter.

·  Rub in the butter until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.
·  Gradually mix in the egg and milk mixture to make a dough, saving any excess to glaze the tops of the scones. Add your fruit at this stage if using.
·  Gently knead the dough on a lightly floured work surface until smooth.
·  Roll out the dough to about 1/2" thick, then cut out 2" rounds with a plain or fluted cutter, kneading and re-rolling the dough until it is all used up.
·  Arrange scones on baking sheets then brush tops with the milk and egg mixture.
·  Bake in the oven at 230°C (450°F) mark 8 for 10 to 15 minutes, until well risen and lightly golden. Cool on a wire rack.

·  Whip the fresh cream until stiff. Split the scones and fill with butter, jam and fresh cream.



2 cups flour
2 cups milk
2 eggs (beaten)
1/3 cup butter (melted)
2 tablespoons sugar (optional)
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt

·         In a large bowl combine the flour, milk, beaten eggs, melted butter, sugar, baking powder and salt until just blended.
·         Preheat a lightly greased griddle or frying pan.
·         Pour about 1/4 cup of batter into pan for each pancake.
·         Cook until pancakes begin to bubble.
·         Flip once and cook for 1 to 2 minutes longer.
·         Serve with maple syrup, jam or fruit.

 And ready to eat!
Enjoy your meal!